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Neighbours, Major Powers and Indian Foreign Policy
 
Aneek Chatterjee
Price : ₹ 250.00  
ISBN : 9788193415757
Language : English
Pages : 272
Binding : Paperback
Book Size : 140 x 216 mm
Year : 2017
Series :
Territorial Rights : World
Imprint : No Image
 
   
 
 
About the Book

Neighbours, Major Powers and Indian Foreign Policy is a significant addition to the field of International Relations. Today, after nearly three decades of economic liberalisation, the nation is poised to become a major economic force in the world. The tectonic shift in India’s economic performance has attracted the attention of the world, especially neighbours and major powers. But the most important question in the broader picture of an ‘Emerging India’ relates to India’s Foreign Policy. Has Indian Foreign Policy emerged sufficiently to allow India to shoulder the label of an Economic Powerhouse? This volume seeks an answer to this crucial question.

The volume is divided into two sections: the first, titled ‘India and Its Neighbours’, studies India’s relations with countries such as Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Afghanistan and Myanmar. The second section, titled ‘India and Major Powers’, explores India’s foreign relations with the US, the UK, China, Russia, Japan, the European Union, and the ASEAN.

This volume:

  • Acquaints readers with the history of bilateral relations between India and other countries.
  • Recommends future course of India’s foreign policy with all the countries studied.
  • Provides a comparative analysis of trade and economic relations between nations.
  • Traces the evolution of Indian foreign policy—from the first prime minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru, to the incumbent prime minister, Narendra Modi.
  • Discusses the impact of contemporary international politics, such as Donald Trump’s presidency in the US and India–US relations.

Written in a lucid and accessible style, this book will be indispensible for UG and PG students, civil service aspirants, researchers and foreign policy analysts.

Table of Contents

List of Tables and Box

List of Abbreviations

Acknowledgements

Introduction

PART I: India and Her Neighbours

1. India’s Relations with Pakistan: Search for Multiple Dimensions

 Introduction: Hostile Beginning

The 1990s: The Missed Opportunities

The New Century: The Old Saga Continues

Recommendations for the Future

Security and strategic collaborations

Environmental engagements

Increased trade

Educational and cultural exchanges

Plans for settling the Kashmir imbroglio

Delinking ‘conditions’ from bilateral negotiations

Conclusion

 2.            India and Sri Lanka: Ethnic Problems and Beyond

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 3.            India and Bangladesh: Close or a Distant Neighbour?

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 4.            India and Nepal: Emerging Issues

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 5.            India’s Relations with Bhutan: Strong as Usual

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security Relations

Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 6.            India and Afghanistan: The Democratic Formula

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 7.            India–Myanmar Relations: Trapped between Realism and Idealism

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 PART II: INDIA AND MAJOR POWERS

 8.            India and the United States: Evolving Partnership

Introduction: Bilateral Relations during the Cold War

Relations after the Cold War

From Rao to Vajpayee’s Second Term (1991–99): Ups and Downs in Relations

The Kargil Crisis and Beyond: Engagement Begins

Closer Cooperation and Evolving Partnership in the New Century

Manmohan Singh, the Civil Nuclear Agreement and Beyond

Prime Minister Modi and India’s Relations with the US

Recommendations for the Future

 9.            India and China: Competitors or Adversaries?

Introduction: Early Warmth to Animosity

Quest for Normalcy in Relations (1988–2000)

Political Relations in the New Century

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Conclusion: Perception Problems

 10.         India and Russia: Rebuilding Older Ties

Introduction: Fresh Beginning on a Rich Heritage

Political Relations in the New Century

Economic Relations

Security Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 11.         India and Japan: Partners in Peace

Introduction

Political Relations in the New Century

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 12.         India and the European Union: Growing Relations

Introduction: A New Phase in Relationship

EU–India Ties in the 1990s

Cooperation in the New Century

I ndia–EU Economic Relations

India–EU Strategic Partnership

Conclusion: Action Plan for the Future

 13.         India and Britain: Strategic Partners?

Introduction

Political Relations

Economic Relations

Security and Cultural Relations

Recommendations for the Future

 14.         India and the ASEAN: Emerging Partnership

Introduction

The 1990s and Beyond: Growing Relations

From Fifth to Commemorative to 14th Summit (2007–16):

Relations Mature

ASEAN–India Economic Relations

Conclusion: The Future of ASEAN–India Relations

Bibliography

Index

 

 

Contributors (Author(s), Editor(s), Translator(s), Illustrator(s) etc.)

Aneek Chatterjee teaches at the post-graduate department of political science, Hooghly Mohsin College, West Bengal. He has authored and edited nine books; and contributed several research articles and chapters in leading journals and volumes. He served as Professor and Head, Department of Political Science, Presidency University (formerly Presidency College), Kolkata. Chatterjee was a Fulbright-Nehru Visiting Lecturer at the Center for South Asian Studies, University of Virginia (2010-11), USA.